Species: Rose Chafer (Cetonia aurata)

Family: Scarab beetles (SCARABAEIDAE)

Category: Insects (Other)

Location: One Sighting

A. Insects (Other)

More extensive information on insects can be found in a separate blog post.

B. Scarab beetles (SCARABAEIDAE)

There are more than 30,000 scarab beetles worldwide. They are stocky insects, often with bright metallic colours. Their antennae, which are used to detect smell, are usually clubbed. Many are diggers, others have horns to aid in fighting competitors for mates and resources.

Larvae of these beetles, called grubs, are pale. Many of these beetles are nocturnal, although flower chafers are not.

C. Rose Chafer (Cetonia aurata)

Rose Chafers are not as common an insect as one might believe. They are active between April and September, flying clumsily, usually being seen in sunny weather.

Their length is between 1 and 2 centimetres. Their colouring is varied (but not to be confused with the Brown Chafer Beetle, Serica brunnea, which is fairly common across Britain). Wing casings show white marks, and there is a V-shaped mark on the back where the wing cases meet.

(Note that the photographs shown here are of the same individual. The iridescent colour of the insect's wing casings - elytra - changes from brown to green to gold depending upon the viewing angle and the light.)

These beetles feed on fruits, leaves and flowers, often of roses, hence the name. Because of this, they are often considered to be a pest.

Images

Rose Chafer

Rose Chafers are active between April and September, flying clumsily, usually being seen in sunny weather.

Rose Chafer

The V-shaped mark on the back where the wing cases meet can be seen clearly in this photograph.

(Photo credit: Eila Holroyd.)

Rose Chafer

Note the irregular white markings on the wing casings of this Rose Chafer.

(Photo credit: Beryl Docherty.)

Rose Chafer

These beetles feed on fruits, leaves and flowers, often of roses, hence the name. Because of this, they are often considered to be a pest.