Species: Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

Family: Fritillaries, Nymphalids and Browns (NYMPHALIDAE)

Category: Butterflies & Moths

Location: NW

A. Butterflies & Moths

B. Fritillaries, Nymphalids and Browns (NYMPHALIDAE)

This is a large family containing many of our most colourful and familiar butterflies. Many are strong fliers, with a flapping flight interspersed with glides and swoops. The Fritillaries are predominantly orange with dark markings, and the Browns largely brown, but the Nymphalids have a range of colours.

C. Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

Possibly the butterfly most people can identify, the male and female having the same markings. Some overwinter, but most are immigrants from southern Europe and North Africa, the major influx appearing in May, although they may be seen on the wing from March until November. Eggs are laid on the upper surface of young Common Nettle leaves. The caterpillars are green or black with yellow streaks.

Images

Red Admiral

The Red Admiral is possibly the butterfly most people can identify, the male and female having the same markings.

Red Admiral

Some Red Admirals overwinter, but most are immigrants from southern Europe and North Africa.

Red Admiral

The major influx of Red Admirals appears in May, although they may be seen on the wing from March until November.

Red Admiral

Eggs are laid on the upper surface of young Stinging Nettle leaves. The caterpillars of Red Admirals are green or black with yellow streaks.