Species: Large-leaved Lime (Tilia platyphyllos)

Family: Limes (TILIACEAE)

Category: Flowering Plants

Location: NW

A. Flowering Plants

More extensive information on flowering plants can be found in a separate blog post.

B. Limes (TILIACEAE)

The only familiar members of this family in this country are the three species of lime tree, only one of which is found in the cemetery.

C. Large-leaved Lime (Tilia platyphyllos)

Limewood is one of the softest of our native hardwoods, has good grain and generally even texture, and is favoured by woodcarvers, and for making pencils. The bast fibres are used to make garden ties and plaited articles. The yellowish fragrant flowers appear in July.

Most medicinal research has focused on Tilia cordata, although other species are also used medicinally and somewhat interchangeably. The dried flowers are mildly sweet and sticky, and the fruit is somewhat sweet and mucilaginous. Limeflower tea has a pleasing taste, due to the aromatic volatile oil found in the flowers. The flowers, leaves, wood, and charcoal (obtained from the wood) are used for medicinal purposes. Active ingredients in the Tilia flowers include flavonoids (which act as antioxidants), volatile oils, and mucilaginous constituents (which soothe and reduce inflammation). The plant also contains tannins that can act as astringents. Tilia flowers are used medicinally for colds, cough, fever, infections, inflammation, high blood pressure, headache (particularly migraine), and as a diuretic (increases urine production), antispasmodic (reduces smooth muscle spasm along the digestive tract), and sedative. New evidence shows that the flowers may be hepatoprotective. The flowers were added to baths to quell hysteria, and steeped as a tea to relieve anxiety-related indigestion, irregular heartbeat, and vomiting. The leaves are used to promote sweating to reduce fevers. The wood is used for liver and gallbladder disorders and cellulitis (inflammation of the skin and surrounding soft tissue). Lime wood burned to charcoal is ingested to treat intestinal disorders and used topically to treat edema or infection such as cellulitis or ulcers of the lower leg.

Images

Large-leaved Lime

There are the three species of lime tree in Britain, but only the Large-leaved Lime is found in the cemetery.

Large-leaved Lime

Limewood is one of the softest of our native hardwoods, has good grain and generally even texture.

Large-leaved Lime

Limeflower tea has a pleasing taste, due to the aromatic volatile oil found in the flowers.

Large-leaved Lime

The yellowish fragrant flowers of the Large-leaved Lime appear in July.

Large-leaved Lime

The flowers of the Large-leaved Lime tree were added to baths to quell hysteria, and steeped as a tea to relieve anxiety-related indigestion, irregular heartbeat, and vomiting.

Large-leaved Lime showing nail-gall mites

Lime nail gall mites are microscopic animals that feed on the foliage of lime trees. The mites feed by sucking sap.

Large-leaved Lime showing nail-gall mites

Although the lime nail gall mite disfigures the foliage it has little or no effect on tree growth.