Species: Common Grammoptera (Grammoptera ruficornis)

Family: Longhorn beetles (CERAMBYCIDAE)

Category: Insects (Other)

Location: NE

A. Insects (Other)

More extensive information on insects can be found in a separate blog post.

B. Longhorn beetles (CERAMBYCIDAE)

There are 35,000 known species of longhorn beetles worldwide, their chief characteristic being their long antennae (which in some species can be longer than their bodies).

The Cerambycidae family of beetles gained their scientific, Latin name from Greek mythology, the shepherd Cerambus having been transformed into a large beetle with horns following an argument with nymphs.

C. Common Grammoptera (Grammoptera ruficornis)

This is one of our smallest long-horn beetles, measuring 3-7mm. It is common in parts of England and Wales. (Indeed, when photographed in the cemetery in late May 2023, there were several individuals.) It is also abundant throughout much of Europe.

Larvae of these beetles develop in branches of broadleaved trees. It is a dark-colour with partial red legs and antennae. Adults of this species feed on nectar and pollen.

Images

Grammoptera ruficornis

The Common Grammoptera is a dark-colour with partial red legs and antennae. Adults of this species feed on nectar and pollen.

(Photo credit: Stuart MA Ball.)

Grammoptera ruficornis

It is common in parts of England and Wales. (Indeed, when photographed in the cemetery in late May 2023, there were several individuals.) It is also abundant throughout much of Europe.

The Common Grammoptera is a dark-colour with partial red legs and antennae. Adults of this species feed on nectar and pollen.