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Name: Sydney Pratt

Burial Number: 1241

Gender: Male

Occupation: Veterinary Surgeon

Distinction: Antarctic Pony Provider

Born: 00/00/1873

Died: 02/05/1926

Buried: 06/05/1926

Story

Heene Hallmark

Sydney Walter Pratt 1873-1926

Sydney was born in Bath, the son of Walter and Mary Ann. His father was a house painter. Sydney trained as a veterinary surgeon in Swindon. In 1896, he travelled to China, settling in Shanghai and formed a veterinary partnership with Henry Keylock. The pair worked for the Municipal Council at the Canine Hospital, 15 Gordon Road, Shanghai. Sydney also became Clerk of Shanghai Racecourse in 1900. In 1907, Sydney and Henry provided 15 Manchurian snow ponies which were shipped to Lyttleton in New Zealand. The horses joined Lieutenant Shackleton’s Antarctic expedition. (This was Ernest Shackleton who was knighted when he returned to England in 1909). Sydney’s partnership with Henry Keylock continued until at least 1919. Sydney was in England in 1922 and travelled from Southampton to New York. His address was given as 157 Brighton Road, Worthing (his mother’s address). However he gave his residence as China. On 21st April 1926, Sydney returned to England from New York on “The Empress of Scotland”. Sydney died suddenly at his mother’s home in Brighton Road, Worthing on 2nd May 1926. Probate was sealed on 5th September. It was granted in Shanghai to Albert William Burkill and David William Crawford merchants. Effects £444 8s. Sydney’s address was given as 36 Bubbling Well, Shanghai.

Researcher: Carol Sullivan

The Grave

Photograph of headstone for Sydney  Pratt

Location in Cemetery

Area: SWS Row: 9 Plot: 26

Exact Location (what3words): gravel.pages.gentle

Ashes or Urn: Unknown

Headstone

Description:

No description of the headstone has been added.

Inscription:

In loving memory of Sydney Walter Pratt M.R.C.V.S. Shanghai, China died 2nd May 1926 aged 53

Further Information

Birth

Name: Sydney Walter Pratt

Gender: Male

Born: 00/00/1873

Town: Bath

County: Somerset

Country: England

Marriage

Maiden Name: Not applicable

No marriage information is available for this burial record.

Information at Death

Date of Death: 02/05/1926

Cause of death: Unknown

Address line 1: 157

Address line 2: Brighton Road

Town: Worthing

County: Sussex

Country: England

Obituary

From the Files of the British Library Board 1926 (Bath)

The Late Mr S W Pratt

Funeral at Heene Cemetery Worthing.

The funeral of Mr Sydney Walter Pratt MRCVS took place at Heene Cemetery, Worthing on Thursday last. The principal mourners were Messrs F T Pratt, Ralph Pratt and Walter Pratt, brothers; Mr Sam Smith, nephew; Mr W A Argent, representing the stewards of the Shanghai Race Club; Mr Norman Rutherford and Mr Nicholas Byers representing the members of the Shanghai Race Club; and Mr Osmund Middleton. Mr F R Stent, brother in law and other relatives were unable to attend owing to the strike situation.

The deceased was the second surviving son of the late Mr Walter Pratt of this city and had resided in Shanghai nearly thirty years, only returning to England 10 days prior to his sudden death in Worthing at the residence of his mother.

Personal Effects

Money left to others: £444 8 s 0 d

Current value of effects: £18271.00

Census Information

1881

Gay House, Walcot, Bath

Walter aged 44, house painter. Mary A aged 43. Annie M aged 18, clerk. Frederick aged 15, painter. Helen aged 13. Kate aged 10. Sydney aged 8. Walter aged 5 months. Plus 1 servant.

1891

Sheep Street, Highworth, Swindon.

Sydney aged 18, veterinary pupil in the house of Sidney Blanchard, veterinary surgeon.

Miscellaneous Information

Excerpt from Sydney Morning Herald 4th November 1907

“Arrival of Snow Ponies”

By the Changsha which arrived in Sydney last week, there arrived 15 Manchurian  or “snow” ponies for the expedition. The ponies are reputed to be able to stand any degree of cold. During the heaviest snowstorms they bury themselves in the snow, leaving their noses out only, and their instinct makes them chose suitable places to camp in. They possess long and comparatively narrow hoofs, and for some inscrutable reason they have been shod. Their strength is undoubted for each can drag a load which would need 18 dogs. Dr Keylock and Dr Pratt, two eminent veterinary surgeons of Shanghai selected the 15, which were brought down from Tien-tsin to Hong Kong and shipped on the Changsha. The ponies have stood the 23 days journey well and have been transhipped to the Maheno for conveyance to Lyttleton where Lieutenant Shackleton’s Antarctic boat will receive them.