Female portrait placeholder image

Name: Elizabeth Braden

Burial Number: 0972

Gender: Female

Occupation: Wife of Britton Alma Braden.

Born: 00/00/1861

Died: 17/12/1919

Buried: 10/12/1919

Story

Elizabeth was born in Forest Hill, London, the daughter of Robert and Diana Elizabeth. She was baptised at Christ Church, Forest Hill on 7th July. Her father was a bricklayer’s labourer. By 1871, the family had moved to Rustington, living near Windmill Bridge. They later moved to East Preston where Robert found work on a local farm. Elizabeth married Britton Alma Braden at East Preston in 1890. The couple moved to Portslade where Britton worked as a labourer. By 1901, they were living in Tarring Road, Worthing. They had no children. Elizabeth died on 17th December 1919 from heart disease. No probate. Britton died in 1926 and is buried in Broadwater cemetery.

Researcher: Carol Sullivan

The Grave

No headstone image available

Location in Cemetery

Area: EB Row: 3 Plot: 4

Exact Location (what3words): leaves.toast.blows

Ashes or Urn: Unknown

Headstone

Description:

None Found - Listed in Heene Cemetery Index of Graves

Inscription:

None Found - Listed in Heene Cemetery Index of Graves

Further Information

Birth

Name: Elizabeth Mary Braden

Gender: Female

Born: 00/00/1861

Town: Forest Hill

County: Surrey

Country: England

Marriage

Maiden Name:Green

Marriage Date: //1890

Spouse First Name: Britton

Spouse Second Name: Alma

Spouse Last Name: Braden

Town of Marriage: East Preston

County of Marriage: Sussex

Country of Marriage: England

Information at Death

Date of Death: 17/12/1919

Cause of death: Fatty degeneration of the Heart

Address line 1: 65

Address line 2: The Drive

Town: Worthing

County: Sussex

Country: Unknown

Obituary

No obituary has been entered.

Personal Effects

Money left to others: No value recorded

Current value of effects: Not calculated

Census Information

1871

Cottage near Railway Bridge (Windmill Bridge) Rustington.

Robert aged 36, bricklayer’s labourer. Dianna aged 33. Elizabeth aged 9. Charles aged 7. George aged 5. Alfred aged 3. Alice aged 9 months.

1881

Old Farm House, Preston Street, East Preston.

Robert aged 47, agricultural labourer. Elizabeth (Dianna) aged 43, laundress. Elizabeth aged 19, domestic servant. George aged 15, agricultural labourer. Alfred aged 13, errand boy. Alice aged 10. William aged 8. Robert aged 2. George Green aged 83, father, agricultural labourer.

1891

4 Beaconsfield Terrace, Portslade.

Britton aged 35, ground labourer. Elizabeth aged 29. Alfred Braden aged 46, brother, ground labourer. Mary Braden aged 73, mother.

1901

3 Kilburn Terrace, Tarring Road, Worthing.

Britton aged 44, navvy. Elizabeth aged 39. Robert Green aged 67, widower, general labourer.

1911

65 The Drive, Worthing.

Britton aged 54, builder’s labourer. Elizabeth aged 49. Robert Green aged 77, widower, pensioner.

Miscellaneous Information

Worthing Gazette 23rd December 1919

Sudden Death – Distressing Occurrence at West Worthing

Having made her Christmas Cakes on Monday week, Mrs Elizabeth Mary Braden, of 65 The Drive West Worthing, gave utterance to the remark, when they were being baked: “I wonder if I shall help eat them?”

A tragic answer was forthcoming some hours later, for she was seized with illness soon after midnight, and died before a doctor could be brought to the house.

Mrs Braden was 57 years of age, and was the wife of a labourer in the employ of the Corporation. His name is Briton Alma Braden, and in giving evidence at the inquest, which was held by Mr. F.W. Butler, the Coroner for West Sussex, at the Central Fire Station in High Street, on Wednesday afternoon, he explained that although his wife complained, some two or three weeks ago, that she did not feel well, she kept about, and had attended to her household duties every day.

The Death and Its Cause

Having spoken of the remark about the cake, recorded above, the husband proceeded to say that on Monday his wife was seized with sickness, but afterwards sat down and read a newspaper. At a quarter to eleven she went to bed, but about a quarter past twelve she got out of bed again, as she complained of feeling sick. Before he could go to her assistance she fell to the floor and did not speak again.

Mr W.S. Nockolds, of West Tarring, was the medical man called in, and he stated that Mrs Braden was dead before he arrived. He found, in the course of the post-mortem examination which he had since made, that the body was very fat, the heart was fatty and degenerated, and the kidneys were also affected. The actual cause of death was fatty degeneration of the heart.

A verdict to this effect was formally recorded by the Coroner, who sat without a Jury.