Male portrait placeholder image

Name: Edward Vaughan

Burial Number: 0329

Gender: Male

Occupation: Clergyman

Born: 26/07/1813

Died: 17/01/1900

Buried: 20/01/1900

Story

Edward was born in Leicester, the son of Rev. Edward Thomas Vaughan and his wife Agnes. He was baptised at St Martin’s Church, Leicester on 28th July 1813. Edward studied at Christ’s College, Cambridge, obtaining a BA in 1834. He was ordained deacon at Lincoln in 1836 and obtained his MA in 1837. From 1836 to 1838, Edward was curate at St George’s church, Leicester and curate at Hathern, Leicester until 1841. On 1st January 1839, Edward married Mary Rose at Rothley, Barrow on Soar, Leicestershire. The couple moved to Shropshire where Edward served as curate at Hodnet. They had five children, Mary, Ellen, Lucy, Margaret and Charles. From 1845 until 1859, Edward was Vicar of St Martin’s church, Leicester. He was also appointed Hon. Canon of Peterborough in 1846. The family moved to Harpenden in 1859 when Edward was appointed rector. They stayed until 1896. From 1877 until 1900, Edward was also Hon. Canon of St Albans. After retirement in 1898, Edward and his family moved to Worthing living at St Martin’s Lodge in Richmond Road. Edward died on 17th January 1900. Probate was granted on 23rd February to Charles Edwyn Vaughan and Henry Tylston Hodgson esquires and Ellen Lydia Vaughan spinster. Effects £10510 5s 2d.

 

Researcher: Carol Sullivan

The Grave

Photograph of headstone for Edward Vaughan

Location in Cemetery

Area: SWS Row: 1 Plot: 24

Exact Location (what3words): face.each.smug

Ashes or Urn: Unknown

Headstone

Description:

EndowedGrave: Responsibility for cutting the grass and keeping tidy

Inscription:

In loving memory of Edward Thomas Vaughan forty years Vicar of St. Martins, Leicester, for XXVll years Rectory of Harpenden, Herts. Born July 26 1813 died January 17 1900 "Of such is the Kindgdom of God" And of Mary his wife born April 15th 1816 married Janry 1st 1838 died August 14th 1901. Also of Ellen Lydia daughter of Edward and Mary Vaughan who passed to her rest Jan 6th 1927

Further Information

Birth

Name: Edward Thomas Vaughan

Gender: Male

Born: 26/07/1813

Town: Leicester

County: Leicestershire

Country: England

Marriage

Maiden Name: Not applicable

Marriage Date: 01/01/1839

Spouse First Name: Mary

Spouse Last Name: Rose

Town of Marriage: Barrow on Soar

County of Marriage: Leicestershire

Country of Marriage: England

Information at Death

Date of Death: 17/01/1900

Cause of death: Unknown

Address line 1: St Martins Lodge

Address line 3: Richmond Road

Town: Worthing

County: Sussex

Country: England

Obituary

The Worthing Gazette – Wednesday January 24th 1900 – Funeral of the Late Canon Vaughan – A Distinguished Career – Pulpit Reference
There died at Heene on Wednesday, at his residence, St Martin’s Lodge, at the age of eighty-six years, the Rev. Edward Thomas Vaughan.
His Clerical Career – He was the son of the Rev. E.T. Vaughan, Vicar of St Martin’s, Leicester, and like his brothers, the late Master of the Temple and Canon David Vaughan (the latter of whom survives him), he gained high distinction at Cambridge. He entered at Christ’s College, took the Bell University scholarship in 1831 and the members’ prize in 1833 and 1835 (honours afterwards won by his brother David); he graduated in 1834 as twenty-ninth Wrangler and seventh Classic, and gained his Fellowship at Christ’s College in 1837.
He was admitted to Holy Orders by Bishop Kaye, of Lincoln, in 1836, and licensed to the Curacy of St George’s, Leicester. He was also Curate of Hathern, Leicesterhisre, from 1838 to 1841, and of Hodnet, Shorpshire, from 1841 to 1845. In that year he was appointed to the Vicarage of St Martin, Leicester, which his father and brother Charles had.held before him, and in which his brother David succeeded him.
The next year he became Honarary Canon of Peterborough, which he held till he was appointed to the same office in the Diocese of St Albans in 1877. He left St Martin’s in 1859 to accept the Lord Chancellors living of Harpenden, Herts, where he remained till 1896, when increasing age compelled him to retire. He was Rural Dean of St. Albans for twenty years, and was Proctor in Convocation from 1850 to 1894. He published a volume of University Sermons in 1850 and the Hulsean Lectures delivered at Cambridge iin 1875. To the public he was less known than his brothers, but he shared (says the Times) their moderate Churchmanship and their gentle spirit.
The Funeral took place at Heene Cemetery on Saturday, the ceremony commencing at a quarter to one. Amongst the large number present were many of the clergy and deceased’s only son, Professor Vaughan, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, Mrs Vaughan, and the lae Canon’s three married daughters, together with their husbands. The body was enclosed in a polished elm coffin, with a cross extending the whole length. The inscription onthe breast-plate was as follows: Edward Thomas Vaughan, Priest, Born July 26th 1814, died January 17th 1900. R.I.P. Mr W.A. Hewer, of Rowlands Road, carried out the arrangements of the funeral.
Pulpit Reference – The Rev. J.P. Fallowes, preaching at Heene Church on Sunday, referred in the following words to the late Canon Vaughan: Yesterday we laid to rest in this place the mortal body of one who came to spend his last few years among us, enfeebled and bowed with the weight of many years. Very few of us here knew him in his prime, or had any access to his learned mind and its freshness. We knew the aged man whose work was done; we heard of the reputation for accurate scholarship and University honours; of his being ofa family singularly endowed with many excellent gifts. But there is one lesson that he has enforced constantly to this congregation iin the three or four years of his time among us. He has silently preached from the text “I was glad when they said unto me, we will go into the House of the Lord.” With all the infirmities of a body that had become burdensome, we may say with confidence that he never missed divine service Sunday or weekday of his own will, and so much had this become the desire of his life as well as its habit, that in the last days of his weakness he wold attempt to rise, thinking it was “time for church”. He set an example also (and none should feel this more than I, who was privileged to be his minister) of a singular meekness. His type is often spoken of as the peculiar product and treasure of the Church of England, men unobtrusive but weighty, meek but leared. George Herbert, Nicholas Ferrar, and John Keble were such men in their several generations, and such a one among us was Edward Vaughan. Let me tell you that this man died as he had lived, in the fear and grace of God; and that the last act I saw him perform as his mind was losing consciousness was raising his hands to invite me to prayer.

Personal Effects

Money left to others: £10510 5 s 2 d

Current value of effects: £821609.00

Census Information

1841

Hathern, Leicestershire.

Edward aged 25, clergyman. Mary aged 25. Mary aged 9 months.

1851

St Martin’s Churchyard, Town Hall Place, Leicester.

Edward aged 37, vicar of St Martin. Mary aged 34. Mary A aged 10. Ellen aged 7. Lucy aged 2. George Von Schroer aged 23, curate of St Nicholas. Plus 4 servants.

1861

Harpenden Village. Hertfordshire.

Edward aged 47, perpetual curate of Harpenden. Mary aged 44. Lucy aged 12. Margaret aged 8. Charles aged 7. Plus 3 servants.

1871

The Vicarage, Harpenden, Hertfordshire.

Edward aged 57, rector of Harpenden. Mary aged 54. Lucy aged 22. Margaret aged 18. Gertrude Prendergast aged 15, boarder. Caroline Prendergast aged 11, boarder. Plus 2 servants.

1881

The Rectory, Harpenden, Hertfordshire.

Edward aged 67, rector of Harpenden. Mary aged 64. Ellen Lydia aged 37. Margaret aged 28. Plus 2 servants.

1891

The Rectory, Harpenden, Hertfordshire.

Edward aged 77, rector of Harpenden. Mary aged 74. Ellen aged 47. Constance Arbuthnott aged 12, grand daughter. Plus 2 servants.

Miscellaneous Information

Vaughan Porch at Leicester Cathedral

1897 Vaughan Porch (see photo) built at Leicester Cathedral as a memorial to the Vaughan men who were parish priests in the city. Vaughan Road in Harpenden is named after Edward.